Instructions

The toolkit is split into two main sections:

  1. Buttons to the left: Information about the toolkit and information for advocates.
  2. Buttons above: Policy map at the EU level for each of the three DRIVERS areas: early child development, fair employment, and income & social protection.

1. About the toolkit & information for advocates

These buttons provide information that we identified would be useful to advocates. It also explains how we developed this toolkit, how we conceptualise advocacy, and a glossary of key terms.

About the toolkit:

  • A. Instructions. Explains how to use this toolkit.
  • B. Methodology. Explains how we developed the information contained in the toolkit.
  • C. Dimensions of advocacy. Explains the "Six dimensions of advocacy for health equity", a heuristic conceptualisation of advocacy.
  • D. Glossary of terms. Provides working definitions of terms used on this website and elsewhere connected with advocacy for health equity.

Information for advocates:

This set of sections provides access to information we identified would be useful for advocates.

  1. Advocacy vs. lobbying. This section teases out the differences between advocacy, lobbying and campaigning. We consider lobbying and campaigning particular activities under the umbrella term 'advocacy'.
  2. Existing toolkits. We identified many existing ones in the course of our work. We did not wish to compete or outdo them, but complement them. This PDF summarises all the existing toolkits we found. They typically describe the steps involved in developing advocacy on a certain issue and the practical steps that should be followed.
  3. Printed materials. Most toolkits have something to say about written materials. We provide some basic guidance on some of the different types of materials you may wish to produce for advocacy.
  4. Economic arguments. For better or for worse, economic arguments appear to hold real sway with decision makers. Although it is easy to tell people to make an 'economic case', finding out how to do so isn't always clear. This section summarised some of the main ways advocates can make an economic case.

2. Policy map at the EU level for each of the three DRIVERS areas

DRIVERS sought to find solutions to improve health equity through policy and practice in early childhood, employment & working conditions, and income & social protection.

The buttons above provides information useful to those who wish to advocate at the EU level; information about the EU policy making landscape is available here. The information is divided by seven policy angles, which are the main angles by which EU policy makers approach action on the DRIVERS areas. The policy angles are pictured below:

The toolkit is split into two main sections:

  1. Buttons to the left: Information about the toolkit and information for advocates.
  2. Buttons above: Policy map at the EU level for each of the three DRIVERS areas: early child development, fair employment, and income & social protection.

1. About the toolkit & information for advocates

These buttons provide information that we identified would be useful to advocates. It also explains how we developed this toolkit, how we conceptualise advocacy, and a glossary of key terms.

About the toolkit:

  • A. Instructions. Explains how to use this toolkit.
  • B. Methodology. Explains how we developed the information contained in the toolkit.
  • C. Dimensions of advocacy. Explains the "Six dimensions of advocacy for health equity", a heuristic conceptualisation of advocacy.
  • D. Glossary of terms. Provides working definitions of terms used on this website and elsewhere connected with advocacy for health equity.

Information for advocates:

This set of sections provides access to information we identified would be useful for advocates.

  1. Advocacy vs. lobbying. This section teases out the differences between advocacy, lobbying and campaigning. We consider lobbying and campaigning particular activities under the umbrella term 'advocacy'.
  2. Existing toolkits. We identified many existing ones in the course of our work. We did not wish to compete or outdo them, but complement them. This PDF summarises all the existing toolkits we found. They typically describe the steps involved in developing advocacy on a certain issue and the practical steps that should be followed.
  3. Printed materials. Most toolkits have something to say about written materials. We provide some basic guidance on some of the different types of materials you may wish to produce for advocacy.
  4. Economic arguments. For better or for worse, economic arguments appear to hold real sway with decision makers. Although it is easy to tell people to make an 'economic case', finding out how to do so isn't always clear. This section summarised some of the main ways advocates can make an economic case.

2. Policy map at the EU level for each of the three DRIVERS areas

DRIVERS sought to find solutions to improve health equity through policy and practice in early childhood, employment & working conditions, and income & social protection.

The buttons above provides information useful to those who wish to advocate at the EU level; information about the EU policy making landscape is available here. The information is divided by seven policy angles, which are the main angles by which EU policy makers approach action on the DRIVERS areas. The policy angles are pictured below:

Children's rights Health & well-being Education Social inclusion
Working conditions & employment Gender equality Income & social protection

Once you have selected the policy angle(s) which correspond best to your organisational ethos or goals, you are provided with a list of relevant policy documents and interlocutors.

Interlocutor: refers to an organisation, stakeholder, platform or other mechanism which provide opportunities for interacting with EU policy makers or direct influencing of policy. In the Advocacy Map they have been further broken down into two categories to clarify those that have a decision-making role and those that are another kind of stakeholder. We recognise that this encompasses a wide range of potential organisations and actors but has been done to clarify and reduce the complexity of the EU-level policy environment.

Policy documentrefers to a policy, communication or strategy at EU level (see graphic below).

EU policy document types

Some policy documents are listed in several different sections: this is because they may mention more than one DRIVER area and/or approach the issue from more than one policy angle. The information used to prepare this section of the toolkit is also available in spreadsheet format. When preparing advocacy at the EU level it is worth familiarising yourself with how to EU organises its economic governance.