of 8
Current View
SPREAD Sustainable Lifestyles 2050
Roadmap: The Transition to
Future
Sustainable Lifestyles.
Policy recommendations for the development of
pathways to
more sustainable living
in Europe from today to 2050
.
Final
Policy Brief,
November
2012
INTRODUC
TION
The
SPREAD Sustainable Lifestyles 2050 European social platform project
has been a
two
-
year inquiry that has engaged
stakeholders from across Europe
from business,
research,
design,
policy
,
civil society
and citizens
who have participat
ed in the
development
of
a vision and scenarios
of
future sustainable societies. The social platform
has identified inspiring examples of more sustainable living practices around Europe and
has developed
a
EU Action R
oadmap of possible actions to enable
th
e transition to
more
sustainable ways of living by 2050.
The EU Sustainable Lifestyles Roadmap & Action Plan 2050
is the final deliverable of
the SPREAD project.
The
R
oadmap
integrates the following
SPREAD project
research and deliverables
:
> Qualitat
ive and quantitative indicators and drivers of current
unsustainable
European
lifestyle
impacts
on the environment, society and individual wellbeing.
> Examples of current initiatives and ways of living that reveal promising solutions to current
lifestyle
impacts.
> F
our scenarios
of future societies where current challenges to sustainable living have
been overcome, sustainable lifestyles are the norm, and supported by society.
The SPREAD EU Action Roadmap
towards sustainable lifestyles aims
to complement
the
suite of
roadmaps
that have been
presented by the European Commission
as of
2011
in the
fields of
energy, transport, low carbon,
and
resources
.
The SPREAD r
oadmap
focuses on
individual
citizens
and how they live in their homes, use different means of
transport,
consume, or spend their leisure time.
2
EUROPEAN POLICY BRIEF
BASELINE RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS
Current unsustainable
lifestyle trends
t
he challenges to
ove
rcome
Our current lifestyles and consumption patterns have an unsustainable impact on the
environmen
t. (SPREAD Baseline Report, 2011).
The unprecedented growth in material wealth in the last two decades
coincides with a
comparable
decline in global resources and
an
increase in CO
2
in the atmosphere
. Climate
change will increase social and health inequa
lities between and within countries. Global
population growth trends will lead to rising consumption levels.
Current unsustainable lifestyle trends
the challenges to overcome:
Together, final consumption of food and drink, private transportation and ho
using lead
to 70
-
80% of Europe’s environmental impacts.
Meat and dairy consumption alone account for almost one quarter (24%) of all final
consumption impacts.
Domestic heating, water consumption, appliances and electronics account for 40% of
Europe’s tota
l energy consumption (with 67% of EU
-
27 household energy consumption
linked to space heating alone).
Car ownership in the EU
-
27 increased by 35% between 1990 and 2007. EU
-
drivers
own over one third of the world’s 750 million automobiles.
In the EU
-
27, app
roximately 60% of adults and over 20% of children are overweight or
obese. Coronary heart diseases
,
often associated with fatty foods and smoking, are the
most common death cause in the EU.
It is difficult for individuals to build lifestyles against wha
t becomes the social norm. But
there are promising
and encouraging examples
of how some individuals and communities
can adopt more
sustainable
and healthy
lifestyles
at scale.
Scenarios for sustainable
lifestyles 2050
Future
societies where
challenges
to sustainable
living have been
overcome
What is a sustainable lifestyle?
SPREAD has defined a
material footprint target of
8000
kg per year for one person
in 2050,
to specify what is meant by ”sustainable lifestyles”. Thi
s
forms the fundamental assump
t
ion on which each of the
four scenarios is built upon
-
The
scenarios
proposed by the project
describe what 8
000 kg
living can look like in four diverse
future societies.
The sce
narios present different options for sustainable living choices
adapted to
t
he diverse
needs, desires and cultural considerations of citizens from across Euro
pe.
The
aim
is
to
bring the future to life, demonstrat
ing
that sustainable living delivers improved lifestyles with
minimum impact and diverse choice for all households.
The
scenarios also consider the
geographical, political and technological factors that determine lifestyle choices.
Two critical uncertainties, and main drivers of our lifestyle choices, were chosen for the axes
of the scenario quadrants:
-
Technology is eit
her pandemic (worldwide) or endemic (local)
-
Society’s governing principle is either human centric (values) or meritocratic (science)
Four Future Scenarios for New European Social Models are presented:
Singular Super Champions (pandemic technology /meri
tocratic)
Governing the commons (pandemic technology/human centred)
Empathic Communities (endemic technology /human
-
centred)
Local Loops (endemic technology/meritocratic)
SINGULAR SUPER CHAMPIONS
Europe has made the leap to a new type of sustainable,
comp
etitive and equitable economy
through radical market reforms.
Sustainability has become
the business opportunity of the
century. This is a society that
celebrates an ethos of learning, achieving and
self
-
mastery.
The
SUSTAINABLE LIFESTYLE
MATERIAL FOOTPRINT
is a tool to
measure and manage or optimize
the resource consumption of our
lifestyles, including the products and
production
processes behind them
(i.e. in the areas of consuming,
moving, housing and health). In this
context, our sustainable lifestyle
material footprint means the use of
renewable and non
-
renewable
material resources (excl. water and
air) plus the erosion caused
by
agriculture and forestry. It covers the
whole lifecycle from the extraction of
raw materials to the processing
industry, distribution, consumption,
recycling, and disposal.
The
sustainable lifestyle material footprint
target has been determined at 8000
kg of material resource consumption
as opposed to the 27 000
40 000
kg average per person per year
today.
The
SUSTAINABLE LIFESTYLE
MATERIAL FOOTPRINT
is a tool to
measure and manage or optimize
the resource consumption of our
lifestyles, including t
he products and
production processes behind them
(i.e. in the areas of consuming,
moving, housing and health). In this
context, our sustainable lifestyle
material footprint means the use of
renewable and non
-
renewable
material resources (excl. water and
ai
r) plus the erosion caused by
agriculture and forestry. It covers the
whole lifecycle from the extraction of
raw materials to the processing
industry, distribution, consumption,
recycling, and disposal.
The
sustainable lifestyle material footprint